finding and pambana

[re]claiming revolutionary musings

Posts tagged africa

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Renowned feminist and human rights activist Nawal El Saadawi was a political prisoner and exiled from Egypt for years. Now she has returned to Cairo, and she joins us to discuss the role of women during the last seven days of unprecedented protests. "Women and girls are beside boys in the streets," El Saadawi says. "We are calling for justice, freedom and equality, and real democracy and a new constitution, no discrimination between men and women, no discrimination between Muslims and Christians, to change the system… and to have a real democracy."

(Source: democracynow.org)

Filed under egypt africa feminism democracy nawal el saadawi protest revolution

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Hair story: untangling the roots of Black hair in America. By Ayana D. Byrd, Lori L. Tharps

The story of Black people’s hair begins where everything began– in Africa. Not surprisingly, the birthplace of both astronomy and alchemy also gave rise to a people in perfect harmony with their environment… The variety of hair textures from western Africa alone ranges from the deep ebony, kinky curls of the Mandingos to the loosely curled, flowing locks of the Ashanti. The one constant Africans share when it comes to hair is the social and cultural significance intrinsic to each beautiful strand.

Filed under Black hair natural hair Africa Blackness

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Pambana, Kenya 1982

“Pambana” (Kiswahili:”Kupambana”-“to struggle”) became the national call for change in 1982. Pambana was the title of an underground newspaper that fired the imagination of a whole new generation. Pambana set new standards in politics as well as in publishing and communication… The editorial in the first issue of Pambana is important as it deals mainly with the role of publishing in their struggle. Entitled Cheche: A Spark can light a prairie fire, it reads:

The first issue of PAMBANA marks a major milestone, indeed even a turning point in our country’s first history. It is the first truly people’s newspaper. It constitutes a step towards creating our people’s own voice and our institutions. The government-controlled, foreign-owned press, as well as the laughable Voice of Kenya; lie to us always. They misrepresent Kenya’s reality and praise every crime and evil act the ruling class commits…Our people want change, revolutionary change.

PAMBANA is similarly neither free nor neutral. It will accept no apologies for oppression or thievery and will forcefully represent the truth as seen from the majority poor, dispossessed Kenyans who have hitherto been so fully ignored. PAMBANA will therefore be militantly and proudly partisan. The current regime, like the previous one, is fully exposed as unable to solve the political and economic problems facing us.

When the first issue of Pambana came out in May 1982, the people of Kenya recieved it with great joy. It filled Kenyans with hope, great expectations. It made them see that it was possible to change the prevailing oppressive conditions and to create a better life for all Kenyans. That is what they had always looked forward to- an organ which would unite the poor and the exploited against the Kenyan ruling class and their foreign masters. Such a unity is what Pambana stands for.”

p.76-77  Durrani, Shiraz. Information and Liberation: Writings on the Politics of Information and Librarianship. Duluth, MN: Library Juice, 2008. Print

Filed under pambana Struggle for Liberation kenya swahili speaking Truth to power demonstration independence anti-imperialism anti-colonialism anti-racism pro-Black africa writing Truth to power writing as a tool of social justice

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fyeahblackhistory:

Diverse societies flourished in Africa and the Americas for thousands of years before Europeans colonized them. 
In this hemisphere, there were hundreds of Native nations, each with its own spirituality, language, system of government, and land base. In Africa, societies ranged from complex kingdoms to hunter-gatherer communities, with many tribal, religious, and linguistic differences.
But the peoples of these continents had many things in common. Many considered themselves stewards of their ancestral homelands. African and Native groups also held similar ideas about animal spirits, the guiding presence of ancestors, oral traditions, a living world, and extended family relationships.
Top: Courtesy Library of Congress, Rare Books Division 
Bottom: Courtesy Florida Center for Instructional Technology, College of Education, University of South Florida ©2002

fyeahblackhistory:

Diverse societies flourished in Africa and the Americas for thousands of years before Europeans colonized them.

In this hemisphere, there were hundreds of Native nations, each with its own spirituality, language, system of government, and land base. In Africa, societies ranged from complex kingdoms to hunter-gatherer communities, with many tribal, religious, and linguistic differences.

But the peoples of these continents had many things in common. Many considered themselves stewards of their ancestral homelands. African and Native groups also held similar ideas about animal spirits, the guiding presence of ancestors, oral traditions, a living world, and extended family relationships.

Top: Courtesy Library of Congress, Rare Books Division

Bottom: Courtesy Florida Center for Instructional Technology, College of Education, University of South Florida ©2002

(via zorascreation)

Filed under ancestral knowledge History africa americas the euro-centrification of mainstream white supremacist history and knowledge civilization

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[Being mandated to speak English] contributes to the trivialization of anything African and lays the foundation for a deeper sense of self-doubt and an inferiority complex…It instilled in us a sense that out local languages were inferior and insignificant. The reality is that mother tongues are extremely important as vehicles o communication and carriers of culture, knowledge, wisdom, and history. When they are maligned, and educated people are encouraged to look down on them, people are robbed of a vital part of their heritage.

Wangari Maathai, Unbowed. (via withendlesslove)

An incredible environmental justice, womanist, African spirit.

(Source: atreeandarose)

Filed under Sapir–Whorf hypothesis africa colonization ethnocentrism imperialism linguistic relativity maathai racism superiority complex unbowed wangari environmental justice

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The American philosopher Lewis Gordon, in an essay on affirmative action:

There are those who praise South Africa for making the transformation to a supposedly post-Apartheid society nonviolently. Without violence? The many blacks (in the Black Consciousness conception) and their supporters who were killed, tortured and imprisoned; the many protesters harmed; the tanks; the guns; the dogs; the 3 AM knock on the door; the many instances of trauma, none of them count? What is hidden in this misguided notion, as with what is suppressed about racism and sexism in the anti-affirmative action rhetoric of reverse discrimination and qualifications, is this: in a white supremacist state, violence is only recognized if it is waged against whites.

So, the hysteria about crime, about insecurity in South Africa is, as no doubt everyone knows, similar to the same in the United States. Even when the actual figures of violent crime declined, incarceration of blacks was high, because there was, in effect, the criminalization of a people. As violent appearance, black visibility was criminalized.

An odd feature of post-colonial states is that criminalization of black populations doesn’t require white institutional leadership. In so-called black countries, the phenomenon is there and it is color dependent, where darker-skin blacks are the most criminalized. The reasons for this are manifold, but most amount to the near isomorphic relationship between closed social options and skin color as a legacy of racialized slavery and colonialism in the midst of post-colonial environments heavily invested in keeping capital in the hands of the former governing population.

Source via AIAC (via fyeahafrica)

(Source: )

Filed under affirmative action africa apartheid black consciousness non-violence racism south africa violence black people usa dark skin

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thothohtoht:

2Pac Gives His Opinion On African and (en)Slave(d) Names (Interview)


Real spit . find your self re mind your self who you are by naming thy self. .

ME:NduguMwalimu AE38LP: Earthy Ape SanhachiNirokusan = “Son of Sun” Sol StarSYSTEM Dokuta Roboto 38’th Ra Botnix Nagi Naqi Naga Mu of Dogohn Hotep step of pyramid parent from Nommo #SIRIUS #THOTHOHTOHT

(Source: digitaljockey)

Filed under politics of naming tupac africa identity police harrasment speaking Truth to power Black love

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fyeahafrica:

On the 9th of August 1956, 20,000 South African women of all races  marched on the Union Buildings in Pretoria to oppose the Urban Areas  Act, commonly known as the Pass Laws  legislation that required  “non-whites” to carry a document known as the Dom Pas which would allow  them to move around, or live in “White South Africa”. The day is now  commemorated as Women’s Day.
Found via sahistory.org.za – overcomingapartheid.msu.edu – bayourenaissanceman and ibelieveinadv

fyeahafrica:

On the 9th of August 1956, 20,000 South African women of all races marched on the Union Buildings in Pretoria to oppose the Urban Areas Act, commonly known as the Pass Laws  legislation that required “non-whites” to carry a document known as the Dom Pas which would allow them to move around, or live in “White South Africa”. The day is now commemorated as Women’s Day.

Found via sahistory.org.zaovercomingapartheid.msu.edubayourenaissanceman and ibelieveinadv

(via dopegirlfresh)

Filed under africa civil rights south africa women's rights white supreamcy white supremacist patriarchy