finding and pambana

[re]claiming revolutionary musings

Posts tagged pambana

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when i started this (re)collection of revolutionary musings blogging adventure, i wanted to create a (cyber)space (acknowledging access privilege) in which the Black feminist examinations of interlocking systems of domination were foundational; and, most importantly, a space in which WE are at center: HOW WE (not only challenge, but,) CREATE. the few times that i have posted healing narrative rants about my personal experiences as a Black person, a Black woman, a Black woman queering gender/sexuality/desires, seeking to (re)claim ancestral and afro eco knowledges with cisgender, light skin (varying access to white privilege in my family history and present, which is also>), economic, formal educational, ‘standard’-fitting able body, health, movement, usa citizenship privileges that endanger and imprison people who look just like me- it has been because that was what i needed, to rant. i do have to say that those are my personal musings that have been most popular on tumblr (i felt complicated things about this, because I feel a dire need to celebrate communities and moments of speaking Truth (independent of the fact that it is also in response to power), i also realize that there is a needed and a collective healing process that comes from personal venting/listening- that is defs a coalition-building Black feminist practice. i’m not exactly sure what i want to say about all this. perhaps only that i am pondering on space that more actively acknowledges the healing power of venting.

Filed under pambana Black feminist musings qwoc

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Pambana, Kenya 1982

“Pambana” (Kiswahili:”Kupambana”-“to struggle”) became the national call for change in 1982. Pambana was the title of an underground newspaper that fired the imagination of a whole new generation. Pambana set new standards in politics as well as in publishing and communication… The editorial in the first issue of Pambana is important as it deals mainly with the role of publishing in their struggle. Entitled Cheche: A Spark can light a prairie fire, it reads:

The first issue of PAMBANA marks a major milestone, indeed even a turning point in our country’s first history. It is the first truly people’s newspaper. It constitutes a step towards creating our people’s own voice and our institutions. The government-controlled, foreign-owned press, as well as the laughable Voice of Kenya; lie to us always. They misrepresent Kenya’s reality and praise every crime and evil act the ruling class commits…Our people want change, revolutionary change.

PAMBANA is similarly neither free nor neutral. It will accept no apologies for oppression or thievery and will forcefully represent the truth as seen from the majority poor, dispossessed Kenyans who have hitherto been so fully ignored. PAMBANA will therefore be militantly and proudly partisan. The current regime, like the previous one, is fully exposed as unable to solve the political and economic problems facing us.

When the first issue of Pambana came out in May 1982, the people of Kenya recieved it with great joy. It filled Kenyans with hope, great expectations. It made them see that it was possible to change the prevailing oppressive conditions and to create a better life for all Kenyans. That is what they had always looked forward to- an organ which would unite the poor and the exploited against the Kenyan ruling class and their foreign masters. Such a unity is what Pambana stands for.”

p.76-77  Durrani, Shiraz. Information and Liberation: Writings on the Politics of Information and Librarianship. Duluth, MN: Library Juice, 2008. Print

Filed under pambana Struggle for Liberation kenya swahili speaking Truth to power demonstration independence anti-imperialism anti-colonialism anti-racism pro-Black africa writing Truth to power writing as a tool of social justice

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"1982- The Year of Pambana"

"Pambana" (Kiswahili:"Kupambana"-"to struggle") became the national call for change in 1982. Pambana was the title of an underground newspaper that fired the imagination of a whole new generation. Pambana set new standards in politics as well as in publishing and communication… The editorial in the first issue of Pambana is important as it deals mainly with the role of publishing in their struggle. Entitled Cheche: A Spark can light a prairie fire, it reads:

The first issue of PAMBANA marks a major milestone, indeed even a turning point in our country’s first history. It is the first truly people’s newspaper. It constitutes a step towards creating our people’s own voice and our institutions. The government-controlled, foreign-owned press, as well as the laughable Voice of Kenya; lie to us always. They misrepresent Kenya’s reality and praise every crime and evil act the ruling class commits…Our people want change, revolutionary change.

PAMBANA is similarly neither free nor neutral. It will accept no apologies for oppression or thievery and will forcefully represent the truth as seen from the majority poor, dispossessed Kenyans who have hitherto been so fully ignored. PAMBANA will therefore be militantly and proudly partisan. The current regime, like the previous one, is fully exposed as unable to solve the political and economic problems facing us.

When the first issue of Pambana came out in May 1982, the people of Kenya recieved it with great joy. It filled Kenyans with hope, great expectations. It made them see that it was possible to change the prevailing oppressive conditions and to create a better life for all Kenyans. That is what they had always looked forward to- an organ which would unite the poor and the exploited against the Kenyan ruling class and their foreign masters. Such a unity is what Pambana stands for.”

p.76-77  Durrani, Shiraz. Information and Liberation: Writings on the Politics of Information and Librarianship. Duluth, MN: Library Juice, 2008. Print

Filed under pambana struggle for liberation